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PALEO 2017:276

Fossil taxa:


 

Bergeria wortheni (Lesqureux 1866) Álvarez-Vazquez & Wagner 2014

 Martin Pavela *

 

 

* Czech Paleontological Society, Na pastvisku 10, Opava, 74705, ČR

Key words: Lycopodiophyta, Lepidodendrales, Lepidodendron, Bergeria, Carboniferous

 

 

nepojmenovany-3.jpg

Fig.1: Bergeria wortheni (Lesquereux 1866) Álvarez-Vazquez & Wagner 2014, Upper Silesian Basin / Czerwionka - Ameryka, PPC

 

 

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Fig.2 & 3: Bergeria wortheni (Lesquereux 1866) Álvarez-Vazquez & Wagner 2014, Upper Silesian Basin / Czerwionka - Ameryka, PPC

 

  • Literature (Literatura): 

Álvarez-Vazquez, C., Wagner, R.H. 2014. Lycopsida from the lower Westphalian (Middle Pennsylvanian) of the Maritime Provinces, Canada. Atlantic Geology 50, 167-232. - online here


  • Quote this article (Citace tohoto příspěvku): 

Pavela M. (2017): Fossil taxa: Bergeria wortheni (Lesquereux 1866) Álvarez-Vazquez & Warner 2014, PALEO 2017:276


  • Date of publishing (Datum publikování):  21.12.2017

 

 


  • Bonus: Original text Carmen Álvarez-Vázquez & Robert H. Wagner, 2014 - online here

 

Bergeria worthenii (Lesquereux 1866) comb. nov. (Figs. 15a–e)

  • ? 1848 Lepidodendron elongatum, Sauveur, pl. LX, fig. 1 (acc. to Zeiller 1888).
  • * 1866 Lepidodendron Worthenii Lesquereux, p. 452, pl. XLIV, figs. 4, 5.
  • * 1875 Sagenaria microstigma Feistmantel, p. 213, Taf. XLI, fig. 2.
  • * 1879–80 Lepidodendron Brittsii Lesquereux, p. 368, pl. LXIII, figs. 1–2 (acc. to Kidston 1911, p. 146).
  • 1879–80 Lepidodendron Worthenii Lesquereux, p. 388, pl. LXIV, figs. 8–9.
  • 1899 Lepidodendron Brittsii, White, pp. 188–192, pl. LII, figs. 1–3a; pl. LIII, figs. 1, 1a; pl. LIV, figs. 1–2.
  • v 1938 Lepidodendron wortheni, Bell, p. 94, pl. XCVI, figs. 4–7.
  • 1938 Ulodendron Wortheni, Renier and Stockmans in Renier et al., p. 63, pl. 11; text-fig. 13.
  • T 1940 Lepidodendron wortheni, Janssen, p. 13, pl. I, fig. 3 (photograph of holotype — obverse side), fig. 4 (holotype — reverse side).
  • v 1944 Lepidodendron wortheni, Bell, pp. 90–91, pl. XLVII, fig. 2 (refigured here as Fig. 15e), fig. 4 (detail in Fig. 15a); pl. L, fig. 2; pl. LIV, fig. 4 (refigured in part as Fig. 15b).
  • T 1957 Lepidodendron wortheni, Janssen, p. 43, fig. 19 (photograph of holotype).
  • 1958 Lepidodendron brittsi, Langford, p. 67, figs. 105–107.
  • 1959 Lepidodendron wortheni, Canright, p. 28, pl. 1, fig. 4.
  • 1963 Lepidodendron wortheni, Wood, p. 36, pl. 2, fig. 1 (greatly reduced, but probably attributed correctly).
  • T 1964 Lepidodendron wortheni, Crookall, pp. 275–279, pl. LXI, figs. 2, 2a, 7, text-figs. 89A–C (copy of Lesquereux’s original figures).
  • v 1966 Lepidodendron wortheni, Bell, pl. XI, fig. 3 (same as Bell 1944, pl. XLVII, fig. 4).
  • 1990 Lepidodendron wortheni, DiMichele and Beall, p. 247, fig. 7.
  • T 2003 Lepidodendron worthenii, Laveine et al., p. 586, 587, 600, pl. VII, figs. 1, 2 (photographs of obverse and reverse sides of holotype).
  • T 2006 Lepidodendron worthenii, Wittry, p. 108, fig. 1 (after Lesquereux 1866), figs. 2, 3.
  • v 2010 Ulodendron worthenii, Wagner and Álvarez-Vázquez, p. 262, 264, 266, 273, 307, pl. XI, figs. 3, 3a.
Excludenda:
  • 1925 Lepidodendron Wortheni, Noé, p. 14, pl. VIII, fig. 2 (= Diaphorodendron decurtatum).
  • 1977 Lepidodendron wortheni, Leary and Pfefferkorn, pp. 6–7, pl. 1, fig. 1; text-fig. 4A (excluded because of the presence of leaf scars and infrafoliar parichnos).
  • 1978 Lepidodendron cf. wortheni, Gillespie et al., p. 46, 52, 53, pl. 11, fig. 7 (= Lepidodendron aculeatum).
  • 1985 Lepidodendron cf. wortheni, Gillespie and Crawford, p. 252, pl. II, fig. 2 (= Lepidodendron aculeatum).
 
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Repository: Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa.

109 DESCRIPTION. Leaf cushions contiguous, varying in outline from narrowly fusiform to obovate, with maximum width in the upper third; base elongate, acuminate, apex acute, lateral angles rounded. Dimensions: 10–13 mm long and 1.5–3 mm broad; ratio 5 to 7. No proper leaf scars, but a narrow irregular, transversely oval to punctiform scar in the upper third of cushion and ocupying almost the entire cushion width. Keel absent; field above and below the leaf scar occupied by relatively coarse, transverse, discontinuous wrinkles. Ligule pit situated at 0.5–1 mm above the leaf scar. Leaves linear-lanceolate, inserted at a narrow angle, rigid in aspect, in excess of 30 mm length, with an acuminate apex and a prominent vein.

110 REMARKS. Several specimens were figured as Lepidodendron wortheni by Bell (1944). Some of these (e.g., Bell 1944, pl. XLVII, fig. 2) are similar to the type material from Murphysboro, Illinois (see photographs in Janssen 1940, 1957, and Laveine et al. 2003). Bell’s specimens show almost total cover of leaf cushions by transverse wrinkles, leaving only a narrow, transversely oval strip of leaf scar. A ligule pit is visible immediately above the leaf scar. (Bell 1944, p. 90, mentions a punctiform ligule scar at 0.25 mm above the “leaf trace”, referring to his pl. XLVII, fig. 4 — a detail reproduced here as Fig. 15 a). Two of the specimens figured by Bell show branches with attached leaves: one of these (Bell 1944, pl. L, fig. 2) represents a thin distal branch with spreading leaves; the other (Bell 1944, pl. XLVII, fig. 2; partially reproduced here as Fig. 15 e) represents a larger branch.

111 COMPARISONS. Although various species belonging to different genera also show abundant transverse wrinkles covering most of the leaf cushions, Bergeria worthenii may be distinguished by large cushions with a generally convex surface, as well as by the absence of a proper leaf scar.

The similar Namurian (Serpukhovian) species Lepidodendron lossenii also possesses fusiform leaf cushions with short, transverse and irregularly placed wrinkles in the field above and below the leaf scar. However, its leaf cushions are always small and have a length/breadth ratio of ≈ 10.

White (1937) mentioned the general similarity of the Mississippian species Lepidodendron wedingtonense with Lepidodendron worthenii and its synonym Lepidodendron brittsii. However, Lepidodendron wedingtonense shows small, transversally elongate leaf scars with three relatively big cicatricules. This distinguishes it clearly from Bergeria.

112 STRATIGRAPHIC AND GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION. The type material of Bergeria worthenii comes from Murphysboro, Illinois, U.S.A., and is of early Asturian age (Peppers 1996, p. 61–62). Crookall (1964) recorded the species throughout the Westphalian of Great Britain, being rare in Westphalian A (Langsettian) and B (Duckmantian), and fairly common in Westphalian D (Asturian). According to Josten (1991) the species ranges from Langsettian to Bolsovian in the Ruhr district of western Germany.

113 OCCURRENCE IN THE MARITIME PROVINCES, CANADA. Cumberland Basin (Nova Scotia): Bell (1944): locality 666 = 1141 (GSC 10232 — part and counterpart); locality 1039 (GSC 9027 + GSC 9301); locality 1498 (cf. — three pieces without catalogue number). Bell (1966): locality 666 = 1141 (GSC 10232 — same as Bell, 1944). Sydney Basin (Nova Scotia): Bell (1938): locality 914 (GSC 4098); locality 922 (GSC 4063); locality 923 (GSC 3514 + GSC 4084).

114 OCCURRENCE IN THE UNITED STATES. Illinois: Lesquereux (1866), Lesquereux (1879–1880), Janssen (1940, 1957), Langford (1958), Crookall (1964), Laveine et al. (2003), Wittry (2006). Indiana: Canright (1959), Wood (1963), DiMichele and Beall (1990). Missouri: Lesquereux (1879-80), White (1899).